Is There A Good Old Days Byline in Your Future?

While going through some old files today, I came across a magazine with a November 1997 publication date. Now I’m sure readers of this blog are not surprised that I keep magazines for 13 years. Being the pack rat that I am, I sometimes keep them for many more than 13 years. I do this because I find great value in magazines, even very old ones. Sometimes in these oldsters I find ideas I can use for brand-new articles; sometimes they may lead to blog posts that could help others find new markets. I think this one could help someone who is new to freelance writing and eager for that first byline in a magazine.

The publication I found today is Good Old Days Magazine. I immediately checked to see if it is still being published. It is — and amazingly still lists the same editor, Ken Tate, as in 1997. And it has a wonderful array of articles focusing on the past. As it did in 1997, it still takes a nostalgic look at the Good Old Days, telling the real stories of people who lived or grew up around 1935-1960.

The featured article in the current June issue is a delightful one about dowsing — the practice of using a Y- or L-shaped twig called a dowsing rod to search for underground water. Among other articles in the issue was one about a Stag Dance, the place where people went to enjoy an evening of socializing; one on childhood pets in the early 1940s; another about Feed Sack Dresses and the Big City (during the depression, women made garments from the sacks in which chicken feeds and other feeds were sold); and Faith of Our Fathers, about the Great Depression at its peak.

I downloaded the Contributor’s Guidelines and there I learned that most of those who contribute articles for the magazine are not professional writers. In fact, the guidelines state: “We prefer the author’s individual voice, warmth, humor and honesty over technical ability. Successful stories tend to stick with one subject (i.e.: how my brother and I got caught skipping school one day and faced the consequences…my most embarrassing moment, etc.)”. That sounds to me like a great opportunity for a talented beginner to earn a byline and a check.

The guidelines provide examples of the kind of stories the magazine publishes, plus specific details about their requirements. I’ve seen the publication on the newsstand at Barnes & Noble and it may be available at other newsstands. You may find copies at your local library. The publishers will send you a sample copy for $2.00 and a self-addressed stamped manila envelope mailed to: Good Old Days Sample Copy, 306 E. Parr Rd., Berne, IN 46711. You can read some of the articles and get more details just by visiting their website.

So how about it? Is there a Good Old Days byline in your future?

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Possible Markets for Your Work: 13 New Publications

Whenever I go to Barnes & Noble, I am struck by the fact that new publications appear on the newsstand almost every week. That’s a remarkable thing, I think, especially in these tough economic times.

After returning from my most recent trip to B&N, I checked out Mr.Magazine.com, my favorite source of information about new publications. I wanted to see what Samir Husni, Ph.D., — Mr. Magazine — had to say about the newest arrivals on the magazine scene. This week I found that he presented information about 13 new magazines, along with his impressions of some of them.

The new publications range from Natural Cat, a new addition to the family of pet magazines, to Fighters Only, a British martial arts and lifestyle magazine, to Gulf Coast Wine+Dine, a Southern hospitality magazines covering Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

If you go to Mr. Magazine’s website, you can find details about these three and the other 10 publications he spotlights this week. They include Rebel Ink, “a tatoo magazine with attitude;” plus a magazine to devoted to the Mambo Scene; a Jiu-Jitsu magazine; a new music publication called Blurt; a New York focused magazine, Prestige New York, that launched in Singapore nine years ago and now is available the U.S.; a publication about loft and condo living called Loft Life; Guitar Aficionado Magazine; a French art and artists magazine called Technikart Paris-NewYork; a new Marvel publication about super heroes called Wolverine Magazine; and Marie, a publication focusing on mixed-media art.

Some of these publications could turn out to be paying markets for your freelance work. You might want to check them out now and get a jump on the competition.

© 2009 by Laverne Daley

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completeness, accuracy, or fitness of the markets, although research is done to the best of our ability.

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Writing for Parenting Publications

One of my favorite ezines, Writer’s Weekly, comes into my email inbox every Wednesday. In that ezine, I always find up-to-date writing information that is helpful to me as a freelancer. This week, I learned more about parenting publications in an article by Julie Engelhardt.

Anyone who wants to write for parenting magazines should like the article, “Paying Parenting Market.” Julie has been writing for magazines and newspapers for fifteen years, including national publications. Julie says that she has found it easy to work with editors of regional magazines and that writing for regional parenting magazines can be very rewarding.

Some writers find their comfort zone writing about hard-hitting news, but my home is writing about where to take family day trips and how to keep kids healthy, as well as reviewing children’s books.”

In the ezine article, Julie details information about 10 parenting magazines. You won’t get rich writing for parenting publications like these, but if that’s a niche you enjoy, don’t fail to check out her article. You can read it here.

Julie is based in central California. She has been published in Family Fun Magazine, Babyzone.com and in regional publications, The Wave, in San Jose, CA and 65 Degrees Magazine, in Monterey, CA. She can be reached at jengelha@aol.com.

Also at Writer’s Weekly you can find regular departments for Ask the Expert (the subject this week: “What Rights Did I Give Up?”) and Paying Markets and Jobs for Writers (I’ve sold a number of articles to publications I first learned about here).

In my opinion, Writer’s Weekly is an excellent resource publication for freelancers. That’s why I’ve been a long-time subscriber.

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©2009 by Laverne Daley

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One Market for Travel (and other) Articles

Today, Peggy from lightgreenstairs.com posted a comment to my “So You Want to be a Travel Writer” article. The information she provided can be helpful if you want to contribute a travel piece to the online magazine TheSmartSet.com.

TheSmartSet is an independent magazine supported by Drexel University. It covers “culture and ideas, arts and science, global and national affairs — everything from literature to shopping, medicine to sports, philosophy to food,” according to the website.

TheSmartSet.com says it’s always looking for “excellent, original, and previously unpublished personal essays, critical essays, reporting, memoir, travel writing, stories, photo essays, and even video projects.”

As usual, before you submit a query be sure to read several issues of the publication to become familiar with its focus and style. And do remember to read and follow the guidelines.

Many thanks to Peggy for her contribution to our market list information.


Want to Sell to In-Flight Publications This Year?

In case you’re hoping to sell to one of the in-flight magazines, there’s a helpful article in the January 2009 issue of The Writer.

Ty Treadwell, who wrote the piece, “Writing for Airline Magazines,” has sold more than 100 articles to magazines, newspapers and Web sites, including many travel markets.

His specific advice for anyone aiming at in-flights is right on target: study the market, follow the rules, consider contributing front-of-the-book pieces for an easy way to break in, and know what not to do.

It’s especially important for freelancers to know how the publications differ and how you can use that information to your advantage. He says:

… just because most in-flights contain a similar mix of travel, business and general-interest features doesn’t mean they all present the material in the same fashion.”

Along with tips about topics that in-flights are now covering, he also provides a sampling of guidelines for some of the magazine.

If you’re serious about selling to in-flight publications, this article will be a must-read for you.

© 2009 Laverne Daley

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Six Magazines That Welcome New Writers

If you’re finding it hard to break into the magazine market, you might want to consider some of the magazines below — these publications all say they “welcome new writers.” It’s reasonable to expect that editors of these publications really want to read and consider your query or completed article. As with any publication, before querying or submitting, be sure to read a couple of issues of the magazine and follow the guidelines carefully. All of the information below appeared in the magazines’ guidelines.

Take special note of the quoted material in each listing below, too. Editors often reveal extra how-to-sell-to-us tips in their quotes.

Sky & Telescope is about the science and hobby of astronomy and is read by more than 200,000 amateur and professional astronomers worldwide. Feature articles cover important new advances or current problems in astronomy and planetary science; key figures and events in astronomical history; and new ground- and space-based observatories. Features run 1,500-2,000 words; other articles run between 1,000 and 1,500 words. Pays for most articles on publication. “Most authors write for us again and again, but we’re always looking for new writers eager to share their enthusiasm, talent, and expertise with our readers.” For complete guidelines, click here.

QSR (Quick Service Restaurant) is a trade journal serving franchisees and franchisors of quick service restaurants (fast-casual and fast food). It reports on news, products, trends and information the restaurants need to survive and prosper in a competitive industry. Departments include “Short Order,” 400-700 word profiles, interviews and reports; “Franchising,” 800-1100 word interviews, profiles, book reviews; “Tools,” 800-1100 word reports on ideas and actions that successfully put technology and other tools to work. For Features, 1800-3000 words, writers and editors work together on finding the best possible angle for a topic and the best industry sources and facts for the article.

QSR generally buys all rights and pays within 30 days of acceptance, “We prefer to work with writers who know the quick-service industry and can make timely, informed queries. If you feel you bring valuable experience and contacts to QSR, please submit a one- to two-page query.” Go here for complete guidelines.

Stop Watch is a trade journal for truckstop and travel plaza operators. Features typically run up to 2,000 words and shorter pieces average 800 words. Payment is made upon publication. Buys First North American Rights. Click here for guidelines.

“We welcome new writers to Stop Watch because we want to keep a fresh perspective. We especially welcome truckstop and travel plaza members and drivers to submit their ideas. They know this business and our writers should, too. The best way to familiarize yourself with our style and content is by reading past issues. Accuracy is crucial. Please be sure every date is accurate and every name is spelled correctly.” Submit story ideas or articles to Mindy Long at mlong@natso.com, or NATSO, Inc., 1737 King Street, Suite 200, Alexandria, VA 22314.

Paste Magazine is a monthly publication focusing on music, film, books and other forms of arts and entertainment. “We focus on Organic & Eclectic music, encompassing rock, singer/songwriters, alt. country, Americana, indie rock, world music and whatever else we think will grab music lovers seeking something a little deeper.” Paste hopes to cover the best music in the mix, devoting space to independent musicians alongside established artists. The magazine welcomes unsolicited articles from anyone who believes the piece is appropriate for Paste and its readers. (Hint: Best way to figure out what is appropriate is to read the magazine.)” The magazine is often available at Barnes & Noble. Check local your local newsstand for a copy.

Cover stories run 3000-4500 words; Features 1500-4000 words; Front of the book pieces 50-800 words; Film Reviews 200-500 words; Book Reviews 100-500 words; CD Reviews100-800 words. Pays on publication and retains the right to publish submissions on its website and other sites that use its content. Go here for complete guidelines.

Relix is another music publication looking for submissions. The present-day magazine is an outgrowth of the 1964 Dead Relix outlet for Grateful Dead tape traders. The emphasis has shifted away from the Greatful Dead over the years and now the coverage includes jambands and other non-mainstream types of music.

According to the guidelines, “We want to expand our coverage of new artists who might be of interest to our readers, so we are always looking for ideas. We also deal with environmental, cultural and lifestyle issues of concern to our audience. We are happy to welcome new contributors, so if you have story ideas, please feel free to drop us a note, preferably by email, to the appropriate editor.” Complete guidelines are here.

The magazine is looking for behind-the-scenes stories: “Straight-ahead interviews and live show reviews are fine (they’ve long been our stock in trade), but we’d like to see more intimate stories about the people who work out of sight, and the places in which they work.” Payment is made approximately four weeks after publication.

4WD Toyota Owner Magazine is an independent magazine for 4WD Toyota owners and enthusiasts worldwide. “It is a magazine that welcomes contributors of all styles, talents, and field. We welcome new writers, photographers, and yes, perspectives.” The magazine wants tech articles, trail run stories, cool rig features.

“Email us with your idea and we’ll give you a word count. 300 is typically the bare minimum.” Pays for submissions, with the rate depending on size of layout and amount of editing needed. Rates start at $50 and go up from there. Click here to read their entire submission requirements and information on how to email your story idea to editors.

Words into Print gives no warranty to completeness, accuracy or fitness of the above markets, although research was done to the best of our ability.

© 2008 by Laverne Daley

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completeness, accuracy, or fitness of the markets, although research is done to the best of our ability.

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Eight Magazines That Pay $1 a Word for Articles

NOTE: The information below was valid at the time it was posted. Magazines, however, go in and out of business all the time, so be sure to visit a publication’s website and check its guidelines before submitting anything to them. Also, check with sites like mr.magazine.com to find out about new start-up magazines).

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Beginning freelancers often sell to low-paying markets when trying to break into the field. Sooner or later, however, they begin to realize that more money can be made by sellling to higher-end publications. $1 a word is a good goal to have — sell a 1,000 word article and make $1,000. Surely beats writing for publications that pay a pittance — or sometimes nothing at all.

To start you on your way to selling to higher-paying markets, check out the following group of publications that pay at least $1 a word for articles. Some pay much more.

American Forests, which is produced by the nation’s oldest citizen conservation group, welcomes new writers. Looks for topics that profile the group’s work, including its Global ReLeaf Forest plantings, and examples of urban forestry, small community-based forestry projects that benefit local land and landowners. Writers are advised to study a few issues before submitting queries. Payment ranges from $100 for clipping items (to 300 words) to up to $2,000 for feature-length articles with photos supplied. Writers can also submit samples of their work and ask to be considered for assignment. Specify your specialty: (education topics, policy, science stories, etc.). Guidelines are online here.

Major articles for Boy’s Life run from 500 to 1,500 words and payment is $400 to $1,500. “We cover everything from professional sports to American history to how to pack a canoe,” according to their writer’s guidelines. Articles must interest and entertain boys ages 6 to 18. Editors want to see queries by mail (with SASE). Buys first-time rights. Click here for complete guidelines.

Scrap Magazine pays $800-1200 for articles ranging from 2000-3000 words in length. Pays $600-$1200 for photo shoots. Scrap is the preeminent magazine for the scrap recycling industry, which is NOT the same as curbside recycling. The magazine provides news and feature articles on topics to help scrap recyclers operate better, more profitable businesses. According to the writer’s guidelines, “The best way to understand the scrap industry is to visit our website and the site of our related trade association and review a sample copy of Scrap.” Buys all rights, including electronic. Guidelines are online here.

enRoute is Canada’s upscale, award-winning bilingual (English/French) inflight magazine for people who work and play on a global scale. It’s read by nearly 1 million passengers a month. The publication’s base rate if $1 a word Canadian upon acceptance. Short profiles, feature profiles, roundup service features, essays, cultural trend stories, short and long travel features and front-of-the-book roundup of short pieces on global travel/lifestyle trends. Read the guidelines for editorial requirements plus some back issues before you pitch the publication.

Coastal Living Magazine is a lifestyle publication that covers homes, destinations, activities and people along the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf Coast of North America, including Hawaii and Alaska, as well as coastal Canada and Mexico and, from time to time, the Caribbean islands and the U.S. Great Lakes. Stories are planned a year in advance during editorial meetings from November through January, so you can research a story now to pitch for issues to be published in 2010. Pays $1 a word, plus reasonable expenses (such as transportation, lodging and dining for travel stories). Be sure to check out the extensive writer’s guidelines before approaching the publication.

The mission of EdTech: Focus on Higher Education is to help college and university IT managers, directors, practitioners, and others to better serve their institutions. The magazine uses features, best practices, case studies, reviews, columns and tech trends. 90% of the publication is written by freelancers. Payment is $1 a word for 500-1500 words. Currently the publication needs story pitches, including specific technologies and schools that would make a good fit for the story. You can request complete guidelines by email. Some advice from the guidelines: “Make sure stories include a technology angle and are relevant to higher education.”

Eating Well is a bimonthly national food magazine that focuses on eating healthfully. Readers are interested not only in cooking and nutrition, but also the origins of food and social issues related to food. The guidelines state: “We welcome ideas from new writers. If you haven’t worked with us before, it’s best to start off pitching front-of-the-book ideas, even if you’re an established writer. Consider it an audition for a longer piece.” The pay rate is up to $1 a word and the magazine purchases all rights, including Web rights. Check out the guidelines for freelance-friendly columns and tips to help you pitch to the publication.

Midwest Living is a bi-monthly lifestyle magazine that focuses on travel, food, home and garden. Most articles take a service approach and run between 300 and 1,000 words. They coverage area is Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesote, Iowa, Missouri, North and South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas, and sometimes Kentucky, Arkansas and Tennessee. The guidelines detail what makes successful pitches to them, what they’re not interested in, and how to submit an idea. According to the guidelines: “Our rates vary depending on the article, the writer and the amount of research involved, but we are generally in the range of 80 cents to $1 a word, plus expenses.” Go here to read complete guidelines.

If you pitch one of these publications and receive a go-ahead, please come back here and share the news with everyone. And we’d be delighted to read your articles when they are published. Please let us know.

Use the listed information at your own risk. Words into Print gives no warranty to
completeness, accuracy, or fitness of the markets, although research is done to the best of our ability.

Please leave a comment
© 2008 by Laverne Daley

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